Homemade ‘Evening’ Beef Broth

January 1st and I’m already canning. I am passionate about using homemade materials as much as our ability, time and sometimes what our taste buds allow. Most canning recipes for broth use marrow bones – but all bones work to make a nice broth. Tonight’s supper menu involve cutting the bone and fat off of 2 rib eye steaks so I took the opportunity to make up some ‘evening broth.’ Simply prepare the ingredients while your supper is cooking and then let simmer while you finish out your evening. Just before bed you will have 1 quart of lovely homemade beef broth to put in the fridge or freezer.  It sounds hard and time consuming – but in fact we find this recipe quick, healthy, simple and budget friendly.

Prep Time: 10 minutes                        Cooking Time:  3-4 hours
Yeilds: 1 quart

Ingredients:

  • 300 g bone, scraps and trimmings
  • Olive Oil
  • 1 small onion, peeled and chopped
  • 1 Parsnip (or Carrot), washed & chopped
  • Handful of celery tops, or celery rib 1 inch pieces
  • 1 clove garlic, unpeeled, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/4 tsp lemon pepper
  • 1 tsp red wine

Preheat oven to 400°F. Throw stock bones, trimmings, scraps, parsnips, onions and garlic in a roasting pan and mix with a little olive oil and 1 tsp of red wine.  Roast in oven until nicely browned (30 minutes).  Turn the heat down if they start to burn.   Remove and place in pot.  Scrape up all of the browned bits stuck to the bottom of the roaster and add to pot.  Add celery, garlic, bay leaf and lemon pepper.  Fill pot with cold water, to 1 or 2 inches over the top of the bones.  Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer (low heat).  Cover the pot simmer for 3-6 hours.

NOTE:  If you stir you will mix in the fats and make the broth cloudy.  If you prefer a clear stock – Do Not Stir.  Fats will be released and rise to the top.  Use a metal spoon to scoop away any fats.

When you declare the broth finished (minimum 3 hours – and your house will smell amazing), use a slotted spoon to remove bones and vegetables. Use a fine mesh sieve or cheesecloth and pour stock through to strain.

Fridge keeping:  Store in the fridge for up to a month.  Fat will rise to the top and form a protective layer against bacteria – remove when you use.

Freezer keeping:  Cool the stock in fridge and remove the fat layer. Pour into a jar or plastic container.  Leave an inch of room at the top so that as the stock freezes and expands it will not break the container. Freeze for up to 3 months.

Versions are endless:  use carrot, parsnip, turnip, squash etc to flavour.
Spices are endless: Warm up the broth with a dash of cinnamon or cardamon.  Add sage or thyme for nostalgic aromas.  Herb de Provence is our favourite go-tos and don’t forget the black pepper

Darling Daughter’s Notes:  The smell always makes me hungry for a big roast and potatoes.  I’d even run out on the front deck and run back in the house just to smell the ‘homecooked – something is on the stove – smell’.

Diabetes Type 2 Suggestions:   This recipe is low sodium by nature. Refrain from adding additional salts.  The spices do all the work for you. 

PLEASE NOTE – this is not a safe recipe to water bath.  Bacteria can build up and the contents become unsafe to ingest…. or they explode in the cupboard and you spend a week looking for the smell of baby vomit.  To can this recipe you must use a pressure cooker.  10lbs of pressure for 20 minutes for pint size jars,  10lbs of pressure for 25 minutes for quarts/litres at 0-100ft above sea level.  Please adjust for your elevation.  

An explanation of Pressure Cooking at Altitudes can be found here.
A map of Ontario Altitudes can be found here.
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